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Arlington Heights
(847) 398-7204

Monday, 18 March 2019 00:00

If you notice a bump on the side of your pinky toe, you may have developed a corn. It may come from wearing shoes that do not fit correctly and may rub against that part of the foot. Additionally, corns may appear on other areas of the foot, including the sole.  A soft corn may develop in between the toes, and this may be a result of the toes constantly rubbing together. Some patients may feel corns beginning to form if they stand or walk for extended periods of time. Preventing corns may be easily achieved, and this may be accomplished by wearing shoes that fit correctly. An important consideration is to make sure there is adequate room for the toes to move about in. If you have a corn, it is suggested to speak to a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Milton N. Kondiles of Kondiles Chicagoland Footcare. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What are they? And how do you get rid of them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctor to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Arlington Heights, and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns: What Are They, and How Do You Get Rid of Them
Monday, 11 March 2019 00:00

The bones that are located in the toes are fragile and small. A broken toe may be a result if it has been severely stubbed or if a heavy object has been dropped on it. Some of the noticeable symptoms that can be felt may be severe pain while walking, in addition to swelling and bruising. Mild relief may be found while staying off your foot, which may help to ease the pain. Many patients find the swelling may diminish as a result of elevating their foot. Stability may be found when the toe is taped to the one next to it, and this may make it easier to walk. When comfortable shoes are worn, which may include choosing footwear that have a stiff sole and adequate room for the toes to move freely in, a level of comfort may be obtained. If the fracture involves the big toe or severe pain is experienced in the other toes, it is suggested to consult with a podiatrist who can perform a correct diagnosis and begin the proper treatment.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Milton N. Kondiles from Kondiles Chicagoland Footcare. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Arlington Heights, and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
Monday, 11 March 2019 00:00

 

Monday, 04 March 2019 00:00

Sever’s disease is a condition that only affects children because their growth plate is still in the process of maturing. A majority of the children affected by Sever’s disease participate in sports and are between the ages of 10 and 15. This condition causes inflammation around the growth plate of the heel bone, which is still growing. The extra stress placed on the foot during sports activities is usually what triggers Sever’s disease. Pain becomes present in the back of the heel, which becomes more sensitive when pressure is applied during actions like running or jumping. Children might develop a minor limp, and they will usually complain of painful sensations in the heel area. If you think your child might have Sever’s disease, it is recommended you bring them to a podiatrist to learn more about the condition and how it can be treated.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Dr. Milton N. Kondiles at Kondiles Chicagoland Footcare. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain asscoiatied with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Arlington Heights, and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
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