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Arlington Heights
(847) 398-7204

January 2020

Monday, 27 January 2020 00:00

What Is a Podiatrist?

People that are interested in entering the medical field and treating foot and ankle disorders may want to consider a career in podiatry. A podiatrist uses the initials DPM, which is an abbreviation for Doctor of Podiatric Medicine. Schooling consists of attending a four year program after college, followed by three years of residency training. Foot conditions that are treated generally include hammertoe, bunions, and heel pain, which may be indicative of plantar fasciitis or a heel spur. Additionally, podiatrists are able to provide their patients with custom-made orthotics, treat diabetic patients, and perform different types of foot surgery. It is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist if you are interested in pursuing a career in podiatry.

If you are experiencing pain in the feet or ankles, don’t join the stubborn majority refusing treatment. Feel free to contact Dr. Milton N. Kondiles from Kondiles Chicagoland Footcare. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Podiatrist?

Someone would seek the care of a podiatrist if they have suffered a foot injury or have common foot ailments such as heal spurs, bunions, arch problems, deformities, ingrown toenails, corns, foot and ankle problems, etc.

Podiatric Treatment

A podiatrist will treat the problematic areas of the feet, ankle or lower leg by prescribing the following:

  • Physical therapy
  • Drugs
  • Orthotic inserts or soles
  • Surgery on lower extremity fractures

A common podiatric procedure a podiatrist will use is a scanner or force plate which will allow the podiatrist to know the designs of orthotics. Patients are then told to follow a series of tasks to complete the treatment. The computer will scan the foot a see which areas show weight distribution and pressure points. The podiatrist will read the analysis and then determine which treatment plans are available.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Arlington Heights, and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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The feet are the foundation of the body, and because of that, they often face a great deal of pressure and demand throughout the day. In order to keep your feet both strong and flexible, as well as prevent injuries, it’s recommended that you include light stretches for your feet in your daily routine. One example of a stretch you can perform is known as the towel stretch. You begin by sitting on the floor with your legs straight out. You’d then take a towel, wrap it around your toes, and begin to pull the towel towards you, holding for 15-30 seconds. Another exercise you can perform using a towel consists of sitting in a chair with a towel in front of you, and gently picking the towel up using only your toes. When practiced on a weekly basis, these exercises should help to build strength in your feet and lower leg regions. For more advice on light exercises you can practice helping prevent injuries, we recommend you consult with a podiatrist for professional recommendations.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Dr. Milton N. Kondiles from Kondiles Chicagoland Footcare. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous one, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising and ice and rest the foot. It is advised to then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Arlington Heights, and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Friday, 17 January 2020 00:00

Before you start dancing...

 

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Morton’s neuroma is a foot condition that involves the feet developing the sensation of numbness, or a lack of feeling. Those who frequently wear high heels run the risk of pushing the toe bones against the nerve, increasing their chances of developing Morton’s neuroma. Because high heels are often tightly fitted, the circulation of blood flow that the feet require may be lessened due to the popular footwear. Those with Morton’s neuroma often report having foot pain, and feel as if there is a pebble in their shoe while walking, along with a stinging sensation. It is advised to vary the amount of times you wear high heels throughout the week to lessen your chances of developing this condition. For a proper diagnosis and advised treatment plan, we recommend that you consult with a podiatrist for professional care.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Milton N. Kondiles of Kondiles Chicagoland Footcare. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Arlington Heights, and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 06 January 2020 00:00

The Tibial Nerve and Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

The tibial nerve is generally affected when tarsal tunnel syndrome exists. This nerve runs through the tarsal tunnel, and is located near the ankle. Damage to the tibial nerve can occur as a result of consistent pressure that can happen from participating in running and jumping activities. Some of the symptoms that are associated with this condition can include a shooting pain, or a tingling or burning sensation. There may be medical conditions that can lead to tarsal tunnel syndrome which can include diabetes and flat feet. Effective treatment methods can include the possible use of steroids that may help to manage swelling, and in severe cases, surgery may be a necessary option for relief. If you have developed this ailment, it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can help you to identify and manage this condition.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Dr. Milton N. Kondiles of Kondiles Chicagoland Footcare. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Arlington Heights, and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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